Go Forth and March.

Dear Readers:

Registration is now open for Sweet Creams and Book Dreams Day Camp, a collaborative summer program brought to you by Main Street Books and Ben & Jerry's. Activities for the week include learning all things ice cream, making a tie dye t-shirt, making your own stationary, and writing to a pen pal complete with a tour of the post office. Campers will be an artist one day and a chess player the next. Daily lunch from Pickled Peach is included and campers will go home on Friday with an ice cream cake masterpiece created and designed by them to be shared with their family. Spots are limited and filled quickly last year, so don't delay! 

There will be some great events at the store this month, including a presentation from writer Bryan Robinson, a visit from NY Times bestselling author John Hart (watch for the interview with John Hart on our Sense of Shelf blog this weekend !), and a musical performance from memoirist and oboist Joseph Robinson. Plus, local author Ann Campanella celebrates the release of her new poetry collection with a reading and signing, and local authors Chasity Adamsand Marnie Schneider spend their Saturday mornings at the store signing books.

Read on to learn more about March's new releases and events. Our events are open to the public and free unless otherwise noted. And, as always, we love to share books, community events, and general literary merriment. Follow us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram

Happy reading,
Adah


New Releases

When Poornima first meets Savitha, she feels something she thought she lost for good when her mother died: hope. Savitha shows Poornima how to find beauty in a bolt of indigo cloth, a bowl of yogurt rice and bananas, the warmth of friendship. Suddenly, Poornima begins to imagine a life beyond the arranged marriage her father is desperate to lock down for her. When a devastating act of cruelty drives Savitha away, Poornima leaves behind everything she has ever known to find her friend again. Girls Burn Brighterby Shobha Rao is at once a propulsive page-turner and a heart-rending meditation on friendship.

With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara Batista understands that most of her thoughts are best kept to herself. But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a notebook. When she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, but she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems, because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent. The Poet X is renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo's debut novel, written in earth-shattering verse.

A few minutes after 9 p.m. on Palm Sunday, April 5, 1936, a massive funnel cloud flashing a giant fireball and roaring like a runaway train careened into the thriving cotton-mill town of Tupelo, Mississippi, killing more than 200 people, not counting an unknown number of black citizens, one-third of Tupelo’s population, who were not included in the official casualty figures. Drawing on historical events, author Minrose Gwin beautifully imagines natural and human destruction in the deep South of the 1930s through the experiences of two remarkable women whose lives are indelibly connected by forces beyond their control. Promise is not to be missed.

An accomplished concert pianist, Richard's every finger was a finely calibrated instrument, dancing across the keys and striking each note with exacting precision. That is, until Richard developed ALS. Now, his entire right arm is paralyzed. The loss of his hand feels like a death, and he knows his left arm will go next. As Richard becomes increasingly unable to live on his own, his ex-wife, Karina, becomes his reluctant caretaker. Karina is stuck in an unfulfilling life as a piano teacher, afraid to pursue the path she abandoned as a young woman, blaming Richard and their failed marriage for all of it. Poignant and powerful, Every Note Played by Lisa Genova is a masterful exploration of redemption and what it means to find peace inside of forgiveness.

When a widower learns that he doesn’t have long left to live, he is struck by the question of who will care for his adult son who has Down syndrome. With no recourse in mind and with a desire to see the country on one last trip, the man signs up as a census taker for a mysterious governmental bureau. Traveling from town to town, the man and his son encounter a wide range of human experience, pressing ever closer toward the edges of civilization. As they approach “Z,” the man must confront a series of questions: What is the purpose of the census? Is he complicit in its potentially sinister mission? And just how will he learn to say good-bye to his son? 


March Events